NIH, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD) NIH - National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute DCTD - Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis

K2- or K3-EDTA: the anticoagulant of choice in routine haematology?

Author(s): Goossens W, Van Duppen V, Verwilghen RL

Publication: Clin Lab Haematol, 1991, Vol. 13, Page 291-5

PubMed ID: 1794231 PubMed Review Paper? No

Purpose of Paper

The purpose of this paper was to determine the effects of using K2EDTA versus K3EDTA, anticoagulant concentration, and room temperature storage prior to analysis on complete blood counts using 4 different analyzers.

Conclusion of Paper

Under ideal conditions, including analysis within 3 h of collection and an anticoagulant concentration of 1.5 g/L, there were no significant differences between K2EDTA and K3EDTA specimens for packed cell volume (PCV), mean cell volume (MCV), red cell distribution width (RDW), white blood cell counts (WBC), red blood cell counts (RBC), hemoglobin, or mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), regardless of which analyzer was used. However, at anticoagulant concentrations >1.5 g/L and with >3 h delays before analysis, differences in PCV, MCV, RDW, and WBC emerged between K2EDTA and K3EDTA specimens. In some cases, the differences were analyzer-specific.

Studies

  1. Study Purpose

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of using K2EDTA versus K3EDTA, anticoagulant concentration, and room temperature storage prior to analysis on complete blood counts using 4 different analyzers.

    Summary of Findings:

    Under ideal conditions, including analysis within 3 h of collection and an anticoagulant concentration of 1.5 g/L, there were no significant differences between K2EDTA and K3EDTA specimens for PCV, MCV, RDW, WBC, RBC, hemoglobin, or MCH, regardless of which analyzer was used. Increasing anticoagulant concentration above 1.5 g/L led to decreased PCV for both K2 and K3EDTA specimens, but the effect was stronger in K3EDTA specimens. Measured MCV remained constant with increasing concentrations of K3EDTA, however, for all analyzers except the Coulter STKS, MCV increased with increasing concentrations of K2EDTA above 1.5 g/L. The authors state that RDW increased with increasing anticoagulant concentrations above 1.5 g/L or delays at room temperature of >3 h prior to analysis, and they state that the increases were larger in K2EDTA specimens than K3EDTA specimens. WBC decreased when K3EDTA concentrations were high (7.5 or 15 g/L) and blood was subjected to increasing time at room temperature beyond 3 h, but the authors say this effect was seen only with the Unipath CD 3000 analyzer, and similar decreases were not observed for K2EDTA specimens. RBC, hemoglobin, and MCH were not affected by anticoagulant type or concentration or storage of specimens at room temperature.

    Biospecimens
    Preservative Types
    • None (Fresh)
    Diagnoses:
    • Normal
    Platform:
    AnalyteTechnology Platform
    Cell count/volume Hematology/ auto analyzer
    Protein Hematology/ auto analyzer
    Pre-analytical Factors:
    ClassificationPre-analytical FactorValue(s)
    Storage Time at room temperature 1 h
    3 h
    6 h
    10 h
    24 h
    Hematology/ auto analyzer Specific Technology platform Coulter STKS
    Technicon H1
    Toa Sysmex NE-8000
    Unipath CD 3000
    Biospecimen Acquisition Anticoagulant Potassium EDTA
    Multiple concentrations evaluated
    Multiple forms evaluated

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